2017-09-25 / Admin / 123
UNIST Student Receives AMOREPACIFIC Great Global Next Generation Research Award

UNIST Student Receives AMOREPACIFIC Great Global Next Generation Research Award

2017 AMOREPACIFIC Great Global Next Generation Research Award Ceremony, held on September 12, 2017.

Han Bin Jeong, a doctoral student in the School of Life Sciences at UNIST, has been selected to receive the 2017 AMOREPACIFIC Great Global Next Generation Research Award in recognition of her recent publication on mass-transfer studies for membrane contact sites (MCSs) within eukaryotic cells.

The AMOREPACIFIC Great Global Next Generation Research Awards is designed to recognize the contributions of Korean researchers, working in molecular and cellular biology fields. Supported by AmorePacific Corporation, the Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology (KSMCB) will select five young researchers and provide them with research grants worth ten million KRW each year for the next five years.

The eligibility for nomination is limited to full-time and part-time researchers at no higher than doctoral level, as well as graduate students and doctoral students who are the first authors of the paper published annually in the fields of molecular and cellular biology.

The award ceremony took place in the conference room of COEX, as part of an international annual meeting, organized by the Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology on Tuesday, September 12, 2017. At the ceremony, ten million KRW in research funding was given to five young researchers. During the conference, the award recipients, including Han Bin also had a chance to present their research. lecture on the research results.

Han Bin joined Professor Changwook Lee’s team in her second year of undergraduate studies in 2011. This award has been given to her in recognition of her recent publication in the June issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), entitled “Mechanistic insight into the nucleus?vacuole junction based on the Vac8p?Nvj1p crystal structure.” The study provides insight into understanding how Vac8p recognizes Nvj1p, and how the resulting protein complex physically mediates this organelle contact site and promotes the molecular events that occur at these specialized intracellular zones.

“I feel extremely honored to receive this award,” says Han Bin. “I was nervous at first, but I was proud to be able to give a lecture on my area of expertise.”

Other recipients include Dr. JungAh Kim in KAIST Graduate School of Nano Science and Technology, Dr. JiEun Oh of Yale School of Medicine, Dr. HyunCheol Lee in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Chungnam National Unviersity, and Dr. BongKi Cho in the Department of Brain Science at DGIST.